Hello Friends, 

Hailing from Chittur, Palakkad, Kerala, India one of the beautiful places in Palakkad, I am an enthusiastic person who loves to help people by giving ideas about things around you. From Technology to Health, everything has got an answer with me. 
Currently residing within the borders of Kochi, with my IT startup Digital Innovation Media, I am an Entrepreneur and also a Google Certified Digital Marketing Strategist. I was so eager and anxious to learn about new technologies from my childhood days, and there will be people like me around, so with the view of creating digital awareness, I have started this blog that might be helpful for a lot of people. 
I love blogging. I love to share my thoughts, ideas, and knowledge among people, and so here is my blog that covers all about Technology, Travel, Entertainment, and Food. 
With the idea of giving complete knowledge about small things to bigger ones, my writings might be helpful to you. 
Thank you for visiting here, and always feel free to keep in touch with me.

Blogger Abhinand PS

 

Thanking You 

 

© 2020 www.abhinandps.com By Abhinand PS 

 

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Abhinand PS

About Me

Welcome To My Blog, It's Me Abhinand PS

 I'm Here To Write - Technology - Travel - Entertainment & Food Related Blogs & Videos. I'm from Palakkad, Chittur, Kerala, India now living in Kochi based on my work related.I'm Google Certified Digital Marketing Strategist. Currently i have own IT startup naming Digital Innovation Media. My focus is to make a digital awareness to the nation and to the peoples. Day by day digital exposure is getting advanced and increasing in everyone's life. That's why i just started career as proffesional blogger. I love blogging. I love to share my thoughts, ideas, and my knowledge to the peoples through blogging. Blogging is powerful source and way to reach widely throughout the world easily. I'm an Ambassador of Appsgeyser too. Thanks for reading my about me page. Keep in touch with me always. love you all. Take care

Technology

In today’s world, mobile, computer, tablets, internet and other technological gadgets are common. Youngsters using it and they are now habitual of technologies. But it’s necessary that all technologies should be used in proper way.

It is necessary for parents that they can make sure that their child is using internet properly. But have we ever thought how safe or secure our children are while using the Internet? And till what quantity it’s beneficial and from which certain level it will affect our child. Exceeded use of internet can affect our children’s studies, level of understanding and it’s also effects behaviours. A study conducted in the UK is shocking because it was observed that use of cell phone for half-an-hour daily may disturb children’s 50 percent ability of talking. It may also effects children ability of present mind.

In that research was conducted for three years with total 894 children age six months to three years. It was observed that those children who spent their more time in front of screen they were find as late talkers than normal children.

According to the team of doctors of American Academy of Pediatrics, it is necessary for parent to keep their kids engage in physical activates than cell phone and computer. Parents must fix one or two hour time for kids to watch TV or use internet. Parents in home and teachers in school must ensure that children watch material free from violence, gender, religious biasness. Nowaday, cyber bulling is very common. Cyber bullying is taking place over digital devices like cell phones, computers, and tablets. Cyber bullying can occur through SMS, Text messages and applications, or online (social media), forums, or gaming where people can view, participate in, or share content. Cyber bullying includes sending, posting, or sharing negative, harmful, false, or mean content about someone else. It can include sharing personal or private information about someone else causing embarrassment or humiliation.


Technology has evolved and shaped our workplaces in many ways, through the adoption of tools like the internet and email for communications, word processing, spreadsheets and presentations for office productivity, electronic databases for record keeping, and robots and artificial intelligence for automation.

Technology is indispensable in our work-lives, and it pervades every aspect of businesses and the public space.

Here are 10 ways in which technology has become an integral part of everyday work:

1. Communications technologies

Long distance communication is one area where technology has made a profound impact on workplaces. Businesses used to employ fax machines, surface mail and the telephone in the past.

Today, email, SMS, and various chat software tools have become the principal modes of business communication. Also, the use of video conferencing is on the rise, thus reducing the need for physical travel.

2. Office productivity

Word processing, spreadsheets, digital presentations and other office productivity software have become so commonplace that their use has become routine, and this has completely transformed office work.

Office software is now becoming integrated with other productivity and decision making tools like PowerBI and this new wave will revolutionise the workplace again.

3. Record keeping and retrieval

Another area where advanced technology is already ubiquitous is record keeping.

Most businesses have switched to electronic databases, rather than paper files, to store and access their records, and this has become an essential and everyday part of our work environment.

4. Internet and search

One other major tool that has become so commonplace so as to become nearly unremarkable, is the internet and its organization through search portals such as Google and Bing.

Information retrieval and research using internet tools hasbecome an indispensable tool for all work.

5. Decentralised work and cloud computing

The proliferation of laptops, tablets, and smartphones has made it easier for professionals to work from anywhere and has led to flexible-work environments like freelancing, work-on-demand, and work-from-home.

Recently, this trend has accelerated because of the adoption of cloud computing which allows workers to store and use data and applications on a server.

6. Analytics and new decision structures

Big Data analytics has become an important tool for all business functions. For instance, marketing through digital channels requires professionals to routinely use advanced tools for analytics and computational advertising.

Human resource departments are using specialised tools for recruiting, performance tracking, and worker retention. Such data-driven decision systems are allowing front-line workers to act quickly, without always waiting for direction from the traditional top-down management structure.

7. Automation, robotics and future factories

Many workers, especially in the manufacturing sector, already work alongside autonomous robots. This is increasingly true in many other settings such as warehouse logistics, office sanitation, and building security.

As more and more robots work alongside, and in tandem with people, human workers are beginning to adjust to this new reality.

8. Adoption of virtual and augmented reality

Sales and marketing using augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) are gaining ground in several sectors.

For instance, real estate companies have enthusiastically adopted this approach and have built simulated environments through a series of linked panoramic photographs of the property's interiors by using high-quality lenses of 360-degree cameras.

9. Conversational systems: Chatbots, assistants
Conversational systems, like chatbots and personal assistants, are important AI tools. Many companies have deployed chatbots to offer round-the-clock customer support and customer support systems usually have bots as frontline agents, backed up by human agents.

Another use of conversational technology is the use of talking assistants that are integrated across their home and work environments and are designed to help workers navigate their duties.

10. Information security

With the spurt in technological advancements, a big concern for businesses is the security of sensitive data.

Protecting customer and business data is an essential task for any enterprise, and a lot of invasive but indispensable security processes, from physical access control using tokens or biomarkers, communication control, and elaborate digital access control mechanisms have become an intrinsic part of the 21st century workplace.

Today, digital disruption is playing a key role in transforming businesses. Major innovations like artificial intelligence, blockchain, machine learning, internet of things, and virtual reality have started to completely transform the world and the nature of work.

In addition, basic technologies like office productivity tools, electronic record keeping, internet search, video conferencing, and electronic mail have already become everyday parts of our work lives.

Travel

There is no greater feeling than having your bags packed and knowing you’re ready to go on your next adventure. There are few things in life that will impact you as much as traveling will. Something happens to us when we board a plane in one country and land in another—it’s almost as if our eyes open again for the first time. The excitement and life experiences that happen when you travel are unlike anything else. It’s hard to capture in words the moment when you see the sunset behind the Colosseum in Rome or when you finally can understand what someone is saying in another language. These moments are transformative; they take us out of our element and remind us of why we are here. Here are five reasons traveling will change your life.

1. You broaden your perspective.
Nothing changes the way you view your own life experience like seeing the way other people live. Not only will you be more appreciative and thankful for the life you have, you’ll also have a new sense of wonder and empathy for other cultures and countries. Soak in the language, the lifestyle and what people in foreign countries value—you’ll realize it’s different everywhere in the world and it will undoubtedly make you evaluate your own values.

2. You learn to live in the moment.
Whether you are seeing the canals of Venice for the first time or the pyramids of Egypt, traveling teaches you to take in the moment of awe and make the most of it. Traveling is a feast for your eyes and it makes you stop and live in that second, minute and moment. It’s hard to be thinking about your latest text message when you’re half way across the world visiting places you’ve never been to before and seeing spots you’ve only read about. Traveling teaches us to unplug, explore and discover new parts of ourselves.

3. You value experience over things.
Once you’re hooked on traveling and understand its true power, you know that looking up at the Eiffel Tower or seeing the beaches in Thailand out-values any merchandise you could ever possibly purchase. Instead of buying a luxurious car, you invest in what’s more important to you—seeing places you haven’t been to yet and immersing yourself in new cultures. Travel doesn’t become something you do—it’s a way of life.

4. You learn to roll with things.
Almost everyone has experienced a time when their flight was delayed or cancelled or they lost their luggage—and the beauty in this frustrating moment is that it teaches you to deal with it. The sooner you learn to roll with whatever challenges come your way, the sooner you’ll be carefree, happy to move onto your next new adventure. Learning how to be calm and not grow frustrated or upset when a flight is canceled or when dealing with the array of travel issues people face is probably one of the most valuable skills you can acquire that will not only apply to traveling, but the rest of your life. You quickly learn that you can handle most situations and that there really aren’t a lot of things worth getting upset about.

5. You are more open to different ways of life.
No country or even city lives the same way. Countries have different cultures, and people have different beliefs, but when you travel, you see that no matter how different people are or the way they live, there is inherent goodness in most people. It’s the common thread that ties us all together.

Food

A healthy diet is essential for good health and nutrition.

It protects you against many chronic noncommunicable diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer. Eating a variety of foods and consuming less salt, sugars and saturated and industrially-produced trans-fats, are essential for healthy diet.

A healthy diet comprises a combination of different foods. These include:

  • Staples like cereals (wheat, barley, rye, maize or rice) or starchy tubers or roots (potato, yam, taro or cassava).

  • Legumes (lentils and beans).

  • Fruit and vegetables.

  • Foods from animal sources (meat, fish, eggs and milk).

Here is some useful information, based on WHO recommendations, to follow a healthy diet, and the benefits of doing so.

  • Breastfeed babies and young children:

    • A healthy diet starts early in life - breastfeeding fosters healthy growth, and may have longer-term health benefits, like reducing the risk of becoming overweight or obese and developing noncommunicable diseases later in life.

    • Feeding babies exclusively with breast milk from birth to 6 months of life is important for a healthy diet. It is also important to introduce a variety of safe and nutritious complementary foods at 6 months of age, while continuing to breastfeed until your child is two years old and beyond.

     

  • Eat plenty of vegetables and fruit:

    • They are important sources of vitamins, minerals, dietary fibre, plant protein and antioxidants.

    • People with diets rich in vegetables and fruit have a significantly lower risk of obesity, heart disease, stroke, diabetes and certain types of cancer.

     

  • Eat less fat:

    • Fats and oils and concentrated sources of energy. Eating too much, particularly the wrong kinds of fat, like saturated and industrially-produced trans-fat, can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke.

    • Using unsaturated vegetable oils (olive, soy, sunflower or corn oil) rather than animal fats or oils high in saturated fats (butter, ghee, lard, coconut and palm oil) will help consume healthier fats.

    • To avoid unhealthy weight gain, consumption of total fat should not exceed 30% of a person's overall energy intake.

     

  • Limit intake of sugars:

    • For a healthy diet, sugars should represent less than 10% of your total energy intake. Reducing even further to under 5% has additional health benefits.

    • Choosing fresh fruits instead of sweet snacks such as cookies, cakes and chocolate helps reduce consumption of sugars.

    • Limiting intake of soft drinks, soda and other drinks high in sugars (fruit juices, cordials and syrups, flavoured milks and yogurt drinks) also helps reduce intake of sugars.

     

  • Reduce salt intake:

    • Keeping your salt intake to less than 5h per day helps prevent hypertension and reduces the risk of heart disease and stroke in the adult population.

    • Limiting the amount of salt and high-sodium condiments (soy sauce and fish sauce) when cooking and preparing foods helps reduce salt intake.

What is a healthy diet?
Eating a healthy diet is not about strict limitations, staying unrealistically thin, or depriving yourself of the foods you love. Rather, it’s about feeling great, having more energy, improving your health, and boosting your mood.

Healthy eating doesn’t have to be overly complicated. If you feel overwhelmed by all the conflicting nutrition and diet advice out there, you’re not alone. It seems that for every expert who tells you a certain food is good for you, you’ll find another saying exactly the opposite. The truth is that while some specific foods or nutrients have been shown to have a beneficial effect on mood, it’s your overall dietary pattern that is most important. The cornerstone of a healthy diet should be to replace processed food with real food whenever possible. Eating food that is as close as possible to the way nature made it can make a huge difference to the way you think, look, and feel.

By using these simple tips, you can cut through the confusion and learn how to create—and stick to—a tasty, varied, and nutritious diet that is as good for your mind as it is for your body.

The Harvard Healthy Eating Pyramid represents the latest nutritional science. The widest part at the bottom is for things that are most important. The foods at the narrow top are those that should be eaten sparingly, if at all.

The fundamentals of healthy eating
While some extreme diets may suggest otherwise, we all need a balance of protein, fat, carbohydrates, fiber, vitamins, and minerals in our diets to sustain a healthy body. You don’t need to eliminate certain categories of food from your diet, but rather select the healthiest options from each category.

Protein gives you the energy to get up and go—and keep going—while also supporting mood and cognitive function. Too much protein can be harmful to people with kidney disease, but the latest research suggests that many of us need more high-quality protein, especially as we age. That doesn’t mean you have to eat more animal products—a variety of plant-based sources of protein each day can ensure your body gets all the essential protein it needs.

Fat. Not all fat is the same. While bad fats can wreck your diet and increase your risk of certain diseases, good fats protect your brain and heart. In fact, healthy fats—such as omega-3s—are vital to your physical and emotional health. Including more healthy fat in your diet can help improve your mood, boost your well-being, and even trim your waistline. 

Fiber. Eating foods high in dietary fiber (grains, fruit, vegetables, nuts, and beans) can help you stay regular and lower your risk for heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. It can also improve your skin and even help you to lose weight.

Calcium. As well as leading to osteoporosis, not getting enough calcium in your diet can also contribute to anxiety, depression, and sleep difficulties. Whatever your age or gender, it’s vital to include calcium-rich foods in your diet, limit those that deplete calcium, and get enough magnesium and vitamins D and K to help calcium do its job.

Carbohydrates are one of your body’s main sources of energy. But most should come from complex, unrefined carbs (vegetables, whole grains, fruit) rather than sugars and refined carbs. Cutting back on white bread, pastries, starches, and sugar can prevent rapid spikes in blood sugar, fluctuations in mood and energy, and a build-up of fat, especially around your waistline.

Making the switch to a healthy diet
Switching to a healthy diet doesn’t have to be an all or nothing proposition. You don’t have to be perfect, you don’t have to completely eliminate foods you enjoy, and you don’t have to change everything all at once—that usually only leads to cheating or giving up on your new eating plan.

A better approach is to make a few small changes at a time. Keeping your goals modest can help you achieve more in the long term without feeling deprived or overwhelmed by a major diet overhaul. Think of planning a healthy diet as a number of small, manageable steps—like adding a salad to your diet once a day. As your small changes become habit, you can continue to add more healthy choices.

Make the right changes. When cutting back on unhealthy foods in your diet, it’s important to replace them with healthy alternatives. Replacing dangerous trans fats with healthy fats (such as switching fried chicken for grilled salmon) will make a positive difference to your health. Switching animal fats for refined carbohydrates, though (such as switching your breakfast bacon for a donut), won’t lower your risk for heart disease or improve your mood.

Read the labels. It’s important to be aware of what’s in your food as manufacturers often hide large amounts of sugar or unhealthy fats in packaged food, even food claiming to be healthy.

Focus on how you feel after eating. This will help foster healthy new habits and tastes. The healthier the food you eat, the better you’ll feel after a meal. The more junk food you eat, the more likely you are to feel uncomfortable, nauseous, or drained of energy.

Drink plenty of water. Water helps flush our systems of waste products and toxins, yet many of us go through life dehydrated—causing tiredness, low energy, and headaches. It’s common to mistake thirst for hunger, so staying well hydrated will also help you make healthier food choices.

Moderation: important to any healthy diet
What is moderation? In essence, it means eating only as much food as your body needs. You should feel satisfied at the end of a meal, but not stuffed. For many of us, moderation means eating less than we do now. But it doesn’t mean eliminating the foods you love. Eating bacon for breakfast once a week, for example, could be considered moderation if you follow it with a healthy lunch and dinner—but not if you follow it with a box of donuts and a sausage pizza.

Try not to think of certain foods as “off-limits.” When you ban certain foods, it’s natural to want those foods more, and then feel like a failure if you give in to temptation. Start by reducing portion sizes of unhealthy foods and not eating them as often. As you reduce your intake of unhealthy foods, you may find yourself craving them less or thinking of them as only occasional indulgences.

Think smaller portions. Serving sizes have ballooned recently. When dining out, choose a starter instead of an entree, split a dish with a friend, and don’t order supersized anything. At home, visual cues can help with portion sizes. Your serving of meat, fish, or chicken should be the size of a deck of cards and half a cup of mashed potato, rice, or pasta is about the size of a traditional light bulb. By serving your meals on smaller plates or in bowls, you can trick your brain into thinking it’s a larger portion. If you don’t feel satisfied at the end of a meal, add more leafy greens or round off the meal with fruit.

Take your time. It’s important to slow down and think about food as nourishment rather than just something to gulp down in between meetings or on the way to pick up the kids. It actually takes a few minutes for your brain to tell your body that it has had enough food, so eat slowly and stop eating before you feel full.

Eat with others whenever possible. Eating alone, especially in front of the TV or computer, often leads to mindless overeating.

Limit snack foods in the home. Be careful about the foods you keep at hand. It’s more challenging to eat in moderation if you have unhealthy snacks and treats at the ready. Instead, surround yourself with healthy choices and when you’re ready to reward yourself with a special treat, go out and get it then.

Control emotional eating. We don’t always eat just to satisfy hunger. Many of us also turn to food to relieve stress or cope with unpleasant emotions such as sadness, loneliness, or boredom.

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